Local

They’re brothers by choice. Longtime ‘chill’ shelter cats need a forever home together

Pair of shelter cats hold a special bond, rescue wants them to share a forever home

Deborah Reddish, director of Kitty City Cat Rescue in Macon talks about the shelter and a pair of cats with a special bond that the shelter is hoping will be adopted together.
Up Next
Deborah Reddish, director of Kitty City Cat Rescue in Macon talks about the shelter and a pair of cats with a special bond that the shelter is hoping will be adopted together.

At Kitty City Cat Rescue in Macon, cats and kittens of various colors and sizes frolicked happily together in a big room while others lounged on top of cages along the wall Wednesday morning.

Two of the cats that were snuggled up together are special to Deborah Reddish, the shelter director. The relationship between Smokie and Bailey is unusually close.

Years ago, the duo came to the shelter separately as kittens. They quickly became brothers by choice.

That’s why Reddish decided they have to be adopted as a pair.

“They are always together,” she said. “We just couldn’t separate them. It would just break our hearts.”

Reddish said the cats’ inseparable relationship isn’t why they have yet to be adopted. While they are nice cats and don’t mind being petted, Smokie and Bailey tend to keep to themselves. When people come to the cage-free shelter looking for a cat, visitors usually go for the ones that approach them.

Reddish said people are passing over two good cats.

“They are very calm and we think they would do great in a nice quiet home where they can just chill together,” she said. “Every time you see them they are curled up together.”

Smokie came in 2013 and Bailey came in 2014. Reddish said other cats in the shelter, especially the shy ones, are often drawn to the duo.

Reddish said to her knowledge, Kitty City Cat Rescue is the only shelter in Middle Georgia exclusively for cats. They have a capacity for 80 cats and are currently full. About 90% of the cats come from area animal control shelters, where they would be euthanized if they are not adopted.

The shelter is a registered nonprofit that operates entirely on donations. They are always in need of volunteers, Reddish said. People are also welcome to stop by and just play with the cats. She said they frequently have college students who will come in to “de-stress.”

“This is a fun place,” she said. “Since they don’t have their own ‘furever’ home as we call it, we try to make it as much like home as we possibly can.”

The shelter does not take feral cats, which are not adoptable, Reddish said. She said if people see feral cats in their neighborhood, it’s a good practice to trap them, get them spayed and neutered and then release them.

She urged everyone to spay or neuter their own cats, even if they are indoor cats, because it’s likely they will escape at some point.

The adoption fee for the shelter is $125, which includes spay or neuter, de-worming, up-to-date shots and medical tests. The shelter is on 4530 Knight Road and is open from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Friday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The phone number is 478-305-7799.

The shelter has taken in 202 cats and adopted 182 cats so far this year, Reddish said.

The Telegraph has been featuring animals that have been in area no-kill shelters for years. Dogs Maggie, Josie, Nala and Bear remain up for adoption.

  Comments