Crime

‘I became a pariah,’ man at center of $3.7M Bibb schools computer scam says at sentencing

Macon businessmen accused of fraud say little leaving court

Federal grand jurors previously indicted Macon businessmen Isaac Culver and Dave Carty on fraud charges related to the sale of computers and tech support to the Bibb County school district. The two declined a reporter's questions after they were fr
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Federal grand jurors previously indicted Macon businessmen Isaac Culver and Dave Carty on fraud charges related to the sale of computers and tech support to the Bibb County school district. The two declined a reporter's questions after they were fr

Dave L. Carty, convicted earlier this year in federal court for his company’s hand in a fraudulent deal to sell computers to Bibb County’s public schools, was sentenced Monday to four years and two months in prison.

Earlier this year, Carty, 49, was acquitted of 12 of the 13 charges he faced as part of a scheme to mask his firm’s role in a $3.7-million computer-device deal with the schools during embattled ex-superintendent Romain Dallemand’s tenure in 2012.

Carty’s conviction in February came on one count of wire fraud for sending an email to an Ohio firm that was used as a conduit for what prosecutors contended was an illegal transaction. Carty was accused of doctoring invoices to make it appear that the Ohio firm had been the seller in the $3.7-million deal, when in fact Carty’s company, Progressive Consulting Technologies of Macon, was the vendor. Progressive had paid $1.7 million for the devices.

Carty went on trial in late January and was accused of money laundering along with multiple counts of wire and mail fraud, crimes his business partner at Progressive, Isaac J. Culver III, was convicted of last July. Culver is serving a seven-year sentence at a federal prison in Alabama.

In U.S. District Court here on Monday, Carty stood before Judge Marc T. Treadwell and spoke of how the charges against him and his Feb. 1 conviction has led people he knows to avoid him and to the shuttering of Progressive, the company and Culver founded some three decades ago.

“I became a pariah,” Carty said, reading from a prepared statement, at one point choking back tears.

“My credit is ruined and my debt overwhelming,” he added. “I will carry a life sentence. ... The internet will be sure of that. ... I will never be able to escape the scarlet C” of conviction.

Prosecutors had asked the judge to sentence Carty to 57 months behind bars, about half a year more time than he received.

In sentencing Carty, Treadwell described the computing-deal scam, which left the Bibb schools with thousands of devices that it never used, as a “sophisticated, massive fraud on the children and taxpayers of Bibb County.”

It was, the judge added, “a sad, sad case all the way around.”

Information from Telegraph archives was used in this report.

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