Peach State Sports Blog

Too much college football is a good thing

Georgia Tech head coach Paul Johnson, left, and Georgia head coach Kirby Smart are both going bowling this month.
Georgia Tech head coach Paul Johnson, left, and Georgia head coach Kirby Smart are both going bowling this month. AP

“There are too many bowl games.”

That’s a common refrain these days, and with 6-6, and even 5-7, teams getting another game this season in a lot of the bowl games, that’s probably true. But really, what’s the problem with that?

I will be watching when the bowl games kick off Saturday and will try to catch as many of them as I can. Sure, it’s not like they will all be must-see TV, and I’m sure I will miss a few, but more bowl games mean more football, and there is nothing wrong with that.

In less than a month, we’re all going to be wishing there was some college football on television to watch, so we might as well enjoy every second of it while we have the chance this season.

Just think if the NCAA Tournament was expanded by a round and 32 more teams were invited to the Big Dance. That’s probably too many. But we would still watch.

The same is true of the NFL playoffs if the league added two more teams per conference to the postseason, or if Major League Baseball added another wild card round. Some people would complain about it being too many and hurting the regular season, but as soon as the games in the playoffs got going, we would watch.

Heck, add another round to the Masters, and we would be right there in front of the TV watching things unfold at Augusta National Golf Club. Five rounds isn’t natural for a golf tournament, but that wouldn’t stop fans from watching.

NHL and NBA? OK, you’ve got me there. Those leagues can’t add more teams to their playoffs. We have to draw the line somewhere.

But back to college football.

Back when the bowl games were in charge of setting up their own matchups and in essence deciding the national champion based on polls, it was a farce that there were so many bowl games. But now that there is a committee picking teams for an actual playoff to decide the champion the right way, what’s the harm in having the other bowl games serve as reminders of what we’re going to miss until August?

Sure, it’s not great to see a bunch of 5-7 and 6-6, and probably even 7-5 teams, facing off in front of half-empty stadiums. But it’s a lot better than not seeing a bunch of 5-7 and 6-6, and probably even 7-5 teams, facing off in front of half-empty stadiums.

After that, we can only focus on recruiting and spring practice. Those are fine to keep an eye on, but neither matches what actually happens during the season.

More football is always better than no football, and that’s what these bowl games will offer us the next three weeks. We should enjoy it because we’re going to be waiting for six months for the next season to begin.

Daniel Shirley: 478-744-4227, @DM_Shirley

  Comments