Happenings

Four ‘Macon Made’ films will be screened at the Macon Film Festival this weekend

Macon Film Festival opens with fulldome film

Viewers got a trippy visual ride at the Museum of Arts and Sciences planetarium watching Diana Reichenbach “Stardancers’ Waltz.”
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Viewers got a trippy visual ride at the Museum of Arts and Sciences planetarium watching Diana Reichenbach “Stardancers’ Waltz.”

The Macon Film Festival kicked off Thursday night with a screening of Napoleon Dynamite and a fulldome experience.

But, the festival has plenty of interesting screenings and events planned for the weekend, including the screening of four “Macon Made” short films.

“This Day Sucks,” “Euphorica,” “The Come Back” and “Erasure” will be screened at the Hargray Capitol Theatre from 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Saturday, according to the festival’s website.

Priscilla Esser, president of the Macon Film Festival, said the films are chosen through a selection process. She said filmmakers submit their films which go to a committee of volunteers who score them.

“There are more and more submissions and then judging becomes harder and harder because just the quality of films that are being submitted just keeps getting higher,” she said. “I’m always thrilled when you see so many local films getting in too that are really great.”

Learn more about the Macon Made films being shown on Saturday:

‘This Day Sucks’

“This Day Sucks” is a film that was shot in and around Macon, and it was directed by Chris Hall.

Hall said the film follows two gangsters through a really bad day during which nothing goes right, and it lasts a little more than 11 minutes.

Hall, who was born and raised in Macon, said that as the director, he really wanted to get into the Macon Film Festival to get support from his hometown.

“This is a big deal for us… Everybody’s excited,” he said. “I’m just really excited that the festival is recognizing and spotlighting local films.”

‘Euphorica’

Phillip Wheeler directed “Euphorica,” a fictional film about a man dealing with substance abuse, and the films lasts more than 33 minutes.

“It’s definitely awesome… Our main goal was to get it into that festival,” Wheeler said.

He said he saw substance abuse as a big problem in his community growing up in Centerville, and he said he hopes this film will influence people to get help.

‘The Come Back’

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Filmmakers shoot scenes for “The Come Back,” a film directed by William Adams. The film is an emotional drama about a man who was recently released from prison and tries to reconnect with his son. The film is almost 33 minutes long, and it was produced in Middle Georgia. William Adams Special to The Telegraph

William Adams, the director of “The Come Back,” said the film is an emotional drama about a man who was recently released from prison and tries to reconnect with his son. The film is almost 33 minutes long.

Adams, who has lived in Fort Valley all of his life, said he wants to show people in Middle Georgia that great films can be produced right here.

“It’s definitely very exciting to know that you’re gonna put something that you made up on the big screen and in front of a live audience,” he said. “It’s really an honor and a compliment to any filmmaker and their cast and crew.”

‘Erasure’

“Erasure,” directed by Rachel Hastings and Ryan Fordham, is a film about two friends reminiscing about their past, and it runs for around 11 minutes, according to the festival’s website.

Jenna Eason is a multimedia reporter at The Telegraph and creates serviceable news around food, culture and people who make a difference in the Macon community. Jenna joined The Telegraph staff after graduating from Mercer University in May 2018 with a journalism degree.
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