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A society was built on sacrifice of children. They have been forgotten. How about us?

Virginia House Speaker Kirk Cox, a Republican, right, gestures as he delivers a speech from the floor of the House during session at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., on Wednesday. Cox spoke against a bill that would expand late term abortions.
Virginia House Speaker Kirk Cox, a Republican, right, gestures as he delivers a speech from the floor of the House during session at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., on Wednesday. Cox spoke against a bill that would expand late term abortions. AP

As Democrats fear the Supreme Court is about to abandon Roe v. Wade, they are embracing federalism at the state level. New York, Virginia and others to come are legalizing the killing of children up to and including during the birthing process. Kathy Tran, a Democrat legislator in Virginia, admitted that under her legislation a mother could have an abortion even after dilating and beginning the delivery process.

A friend of mine sent along the following regarding all of this and I offer it up now to you for your consideration:

Nearly six centuries ago, the tottering and sclerotic Chimu imperium desperately sought the favor of the gods. Its priests and its officialdom took 500 children — took, not necessarily seized, as the Chimu citizenry were largely of the same mind — and slaughtered them all. The killings were a grim horror: the children were held down by the hands of attendants as the priests did their work. First a deep horizontal cut, slashing bone, upon the chest of the still-living and aware child. Then a hand and short blade plunged into the open wound, and the beating heart was ripped out. Five hundred innocents dead in conscious agony. It didn’t work. The gods, being something other than that, were silent.

The Chimu were overrun and destroyed by the Inca, who were themselves in turn eradicated by the Spanish, whose efforts ending pre-Columbian American human sacrifice and the religions that commanded it ought to be counted as a service to mankind. Now the principal thing we know of the Chimu is this mass slaughter of children. We have found their graves. We know some of their great and glorious worthies, their kings and princes, their rich and powerful, their cities and realm. We mostly know of the least among them, their little children, and what they did to them. It is ample testament to who they were.

Why did they do it? We have sufficient answer from the comparable practices of child sacrifice among the contemporary Mexica, or the Canaanites of previous centuries. There was a way of life they wished to preserve for themselves, and somehow they persuaded themselves that it was unsustainable and unthinkable without the deaths of others: adults to be sure, but especially children. None of these cultures could have known of Dostoevsky of course, but they faced the same question he had posed to Alyosha Karamazov: “Imagine that you are creating a fabric of human destiny with the object of making men happy in the end, giving them peace and rest at last, but that it was essential and inevitable to torture to death only one tiny creature—that baby beating its breast with its fist, for instance—and to found that edifice on its unavenged tears, would you consent to be the architect on those conditions?” Alyosha said no.

The Chimu, the Mexica, the Canaanites said yes. Not just them, of course. A meaningful cohort of Germans actively assisting, or passively acquiescing, to the Holocaust accepted the same logic: They must die that we may live as we wish. It’s a pity but this is what the gods — or whatever we are empowering as our gods, be it spurious laws of racial destiny or “progress” — demand. This is the fallibility of the human condition.

Erick Erickson is host of Atlanta’s Evening News on WSB Radio.

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