Letters to the Editor

This is Viewpoints for Sunday, November 5, 2017

Parisians and tourists wander in front of the Apple store located near the Paris Opera. The House Republican tax bill is meant to send trillions in corporate profits overseas pouring back home and, in the process, give the U.S. economy a healthy boost. Once the bill took effect, most overseas profits could be returned to the United States tax-free. Some very high overseas profits would incur a U.S. tax of 10 percent.
Parisians and tourists wander in front of the Apple store located near the Paris Opera. The House Republican tax bill is meant to send trillions in corporate profits overseas pouring back home and, in the process, give the U.S. economy a healthy boost. Once the bill took effect, most overseas profits could be returned to the United States tax-free. Some very high overseas profits would incur a U.S. tax of 10 percent. AP

Old slogans

“Let the states do it.” “Get rid of excessive business regulations.” “No new taxes.” These political slogans have been around for ages and I agree with them, but only to a point.

“Let the states do it.” The states don’t have the money to “do it” in most cases. We have always lived in a nation of states, not little countries. In fact, a lot of our freedoms we take for granted because of federal laws passed long ago. We are free to travel between states. If left to the individual states, there would be no national parks or interstate highway system or benefits such as Social Security.

“Get rid of excessive business regulation.” I’m all for that, but be careful what you ask for. Remember the savings and loan collapse that added billions of dollars to our national debt. And then came the Great Recession where they used the national debt like a Too-Big-To-Fail credit card. Some regulation is needed.

Gary Gordon,

Warner Robins

Read and heed

I wish everyone would cut out and read Dick Yarbrough’s Oct. 24 column to the White House. President Trump needs to read and heed every word.

Linda Jones,

Perry

Speaking inerrantly

I do not know what exactly Bill Cummings meant when he penned the words “In other words, no one knows exactly what was spoken — except several Christians who believe God somehow spoke, inerrantly to the evangelists.” But I do know one thing with absolute certainty. I do know at least one thing without the slightest concern of successful contradiction.

Whenever the Almighty God speaks, he always speaks, inerrantly.

Don Sweat,

Macon

Reckoning

Congressional Republicans and I have a different concept of a budget. To them it means they can spend tax revenues and borrow money to fund their pet projects. They have not passed a balanced budget for seven years. Their 2018 budget is $4 trillion-plus and will add $80 billion to the debt. They raised the debt limit and it will be over $23 trillion by 2028.

The budget has two parts — mandatory spending and discretionary spending. Mandatory spending includes Social Security, Medicare and debt maintenance. It accounts for about 45 percent of all spending. Discretionary spending accounts for the rest.

More people are retiring and will receive Social Security payments and Medicare insurance. This means fewer workers will be paying into Social Security and Medicare. Therefore, funding for Social Security and Medicare will need to increase. Congress will have to increase borrowing to pay for this. As the debt increases so does the amount of tax revenues required to maintain it. About 7 percent of tax revenues are used to maintain the debt. This will increase to 8 percent soon. Therefore, mandatory spending will consume over 50 percent of tax revenues. There will be less than 50 percent for discretionary spending.

Congressional Republicans have to do something now or we will become a debtor nation. They hope voters will continue to r-elect them until 2028. By then most of them will have retired and will be collecting their pensions and it will be someone else’s problem.

Jim Costello,

Perry

Fall back

Nov. 5 will be especially important to a host of Donny Trump and MAGA supporters. I suspect they will don black hooded robes, gather in a circle and celebrate turning back the hands of time. (Keep in mind, boys and girls, Spring is just around the corner.)

Bob Carnot,

Warner Robins

‘Joe knows’

It’s an honor to speak to the citizens of Warner Robins. My name is Faye Coulter, a former employee for the city of Warner Robins for 20 years. My tenure included being the executive assistant to five mayors: Henrietta McIntyre, Donald Walker, John Havrilla, Clifford Holmes and Chuck Shaheen.

This is where I met Joe Musselwhite. Five different mayors in 20 years and a lot of changes, but one thing remained constant, Joe Musselwhite’s dedication and willingness to help citizens and his knowledge to make it happen. There was never a question, request or complaint I received that Joe couldn’t handle. When Joe was out of town and Warner Robins faced unexpected bad weather, he turned around and came home to help. I witnessed Joe’s dedication and loyalty. Honestly, I know, “Joe knows.”

Joe is capable of turning our city in the direction to lower crime, give recreation an opportunity to move forward, help citizens with tax rates and give them a voice in their government, manage money by the law, clean up and revitalize economic development, operate with transparency and of most importance, give support to Robins Air Force Base.

Warner Robins needs a new attitude from a hometown citizen who already has 21 years previous experience and knowledge of the city. Joe believes as city employees their job is to serve.

“Joe knows” the who, what, when, where and why for our city to thrive once more.

Faye Coulter,

Warner Robins

Tax reform

Regarding the federal tax changes: The targets are always moving, but I have concerns about the possibility of child tax rebates to be given whether or not the taxpayer has paid/owes any taxes. This is essentially paying someone to have a child, which is the wrong incentive for having a child. Possible alternatives are child tax rebates not to exceed the amount paid in taxes or child tax credits. Paying rebates for the first two children without restrictions, plus either of the other two suggestions, would probably outrage right and left-wingers, but I am a zero population growth advocate.

Regarding lowering corporate tax rates: I think it would be great if the corporations that would benefit from this change would announce what plans they have for the money saved. If the money goes to executive pay or shareholders, rather than expanding the workplace and workforce, I'd like to see the corporations defend that position before having the taxes changed. But I suppose they'll try to ague that they don't want to give away corporate secrets to the competition. But I can dream.

Stella Tsai,

Macon

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