Crime

Skeletal remains of slain Macon women linked to suspected Georgia-born serial killer

Serial killer linked to 90 murders confesses to 1979 homicide of Columbus woman

A convicted serial killer serving a life sentence has confessed to the 1979 homicide of a Columbus woman, Russell County District Attorney Ken Davis confirmed. Samuel Little was convicted in 2014 of killing three women in Los Angeles in the 1980s.
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A convicted serial killer serving a life sentence has confessed to the 1979 homicide of a Columbus woman, Russell County District Attorney Ken Davis confirmed. Samuel Little was convicted in 2014 of killing three women in Los Angeles in the 1980s.

The slayings of two Macon women — one found dead in 1977, the other in 1982 — have been linked to suspected serial killer Samuel Little, a Georgia-born and convicted triple-murderer in California who has recently confessed to upward of 90 homicides across the country.

The 78-year-old Little, a native of Reynolds in Taylor County, who was extradited to Texas in connection with killings there, recently spoke with Texas investigators about a pair of unsolved homicides in Macon.

Sheriff’s officials here on Friday announced that Little has confessed to the Macon slayings, one of which includes the strangling of 18-year-old Fredonia Smith.

Smith was last seen July 10, 1982. Her parents told The Telegraph she “wanted to get some ice cream, accepted some money and walked to a street corner near her home the night she disappeared,” according to newspaper archives. “At the corner, she accepted a ride from a man she knew, her parents said.”

More than a month later, on Aug. 19 that year, Smith’s skeletal remains were discovered in a backyard on Magnolia Street near Washington Park. Clothing, jewelry and a wallet also were found with the bones.

The GBI identified Smith by matching her bones to X-rays from local hospital records.

The other slain victim’s remains were found Sept. 8, 1977, off Riverside Drive near Sue Drive, authorities said. She, too, was strangled but has never been identified.

The GBI estimated the unidentified woman was in her 30s or 40s. Years after her remains were found, a forensic artist created a reconstruction of what the woman’s face could have looked like. The picture is posted on the GBI website along with dozens of other unidentified human remains.

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Medical examiner Dr. Byron Dawson, right, examines human remains discovered near Washington Park in August 1982. Macon police officers Bobby Lowe, left, Donny Foster, center, and GBI crime scene investigator Jay Jarvis, right, look on. Telegraph archives

Authorities here on Friday said Little “gave investigators specific details and information which linked him to both” bodies.

Officials in Macon said that after Little told police in Texas about the two unsolved killings in Macon, Bibb investigators, armed with information about the cases, traveled to Texas and observed interviews with Little to corroborate what he was saying.

Local officials also said Friday that Little worked for the city’s sanitation department in 1975. The same year he was arrested on a drunken-driving charge here, but gave police the alias William Lewis.

Telegraph writer Laura Corley contributed to this report. Telegraph archives were used in this report.

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