The Sun News

Past and present will be on display as Wings and Wheels show marks 25th year

Show car enthusiasts brought their machines to a previous Wings and Wheels event at the Museum of Aviation in Warner Robins. This year’s event will be Saturday.
Show car enthusiasts brought their machines to a previous Wings and Wheels event at the Museum of Aviation in Warner Robins. This year’s event will be Saturday. gblankenship@macon.com

Who: Bob Denison is chairman of the Wings and Wheels Car Show

What: Wings and Wheels Car Show: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 4.

Where will this event take place, and how much does it cost?

A. The cars will be set up in the Museum of Aviation parking lot. Spectators can park across the street at Anchor Glass. Registration for the entries starts at 8 a.m. and closes at 11 a.m. Judging begins shortly after around 11 a.m. and concludes between 2:30 and 3 p.m. Awards will be given out between 3:30 and 4 p.m. The cost is $25 per car. Spectator admission is free.

Q. What makes this car show different from others?

A. This event combines “wings and wheels” – literally. The Museum of Aviation will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. to anyone who wants to go through it, so we’re combining the four hangars full of airplanes and the car show. That’s where “the wings and wheels” comes from.

Q. How long has this event been held?

A. This is the 25th year. In the past, the museum had done it, but this year,... I spoke up and became chairman of it. Last year, there were between 500 and 600 people at the event, which included approximately 200 entries. We’re hoping to get around 250 entries this year. Last year, people traveled from all over Georgia, Florida, Alabama and Tennessee for the car show.

Q. Who will this event appeal to?

A. At most car shows, a lot of families come out … a lot of kids. They all enjoy the old cars. It’s something for all age groups. It’s a learning experience. It shows people the past and the present. The old cars have a lot that has been forgotten….the style and the nostalgia. People are happy to talk about their cars…it’s like being a proud kid. Some of the car owners like their cars better than their kids…(the cars) don’t talk back to you!

Q. What are the categories, and what do judges look for in a car?

The thing with any car show – the cars are at least 25 years old. It is open to all cars through all ages. The vehicles are put into 59 different classes, so it’s better competition, and the classes are broken down by the types and years. We have original and modified in the same years – too much difference in them, so it’s not fair to judge the two together. The judges look at paint finishes, authenticity, general overall cleanliness, fit and finish.

Q. What kind of cars do you have at the show?

A. So far with pre-registration, the earliest we have coming in are two 1930s cars. We hope to have some older ones coming in, but we don’t know what will show up until they actually get here. There will be a lot from the 1950s and 60s. Then you get into the Camaros, Corvettes, Porches, Mustangs, Jeeps, and Volkswagons…all broken down in classes so people will have a chance in all classes.

Q. What are the awards and prizes?

A. The Corvette Club, Porsche Club, Middle Georgia Cruisers, Antique Chevrolet Club of America, and Middle Georgia Mustang Club are sponsoring the event, and they are the ones doing the work, getting door prizes, and getting people to donate money.

We have a lot of door prizes, from $25 to $50 gift cards, buckets of car wash supplies valued at $45, tool boxes, restaurant certificates and other items. The prizes are still being gathered. Right now, we have 90 door prizes for entries. The door prizes are for the registered entries; however, the public can buy a 50/50 ticket at $1 a ticket or six for $5. The ticket winner will get half , and half will go to a local hospice, with a small portion going to the Museum of Aviation for use of (museum) facilities. We want to keep our donations local.

Answers may have been edited for length and clarity. Compiled by Kimberly Cassel Pritchett.

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