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Have you ever wanted to study in China? This Mercer student gets to go for free.

Mercer University junior Emily Harvey received a Critical Language Scholarship by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs that will pay for her to study Chinese in Changchun, China, according to a news release.
Mercer University junior Emily Harvey received a Critical Language Scholarship by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs that will pay for her to study Chinese in Changchun, China, according to a news release. Special to The Telegraph

A Mercer University student gets to spend the summer in China for free.

Mercer junior Emily Harvey received a Critical Language Scholarship by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs that will pay for her to study Chinese in Changchun, China, according to a news release.

“I still feel just extremely lucky because its a really incredible opportunity especially just having been to China before and knowing how valuable it is to be surrounded by native speakers, I’m really excited,” Harvey said. “I’m sure I’m going to make a lot of growth and learn a lot of things, so I just feel just incredibly grateful and excited.”

Harvey said she is a double-major in journalism and law and public policy, and she plans to pursue a career in international law.

The program requires students to commit to speaking only Chinese for the entire trip, Harvey said. She went on a trip to China last year with a group of students and her Chinese professor, Miao Marone, an adjunct instructor of Asian studies.

“My Chinese professor was like extremely helpful, and I ... probably wouldn’t have done it without her,” Harvey said.

Harvey is participates in many campus organizations including the Student Government Association, Greek Life and the Green Coalition, according to the release.

“The Critical Language Scholarship is a highly selective program, and I’m so proud of Emily for her achievements,” said Marone in the release. “Emily is an enthusiastic learner who strives to reach her potential.

Math Olympics at Middle Georgia State University

Several Middle Georgia teams placed at the 39th annual Math Olympics at Middle Georgia State University on March 8.

In Division I, Tattnall Square Academy varsity team one, including Colleen Molton, Beijun Desai, Kelly Collins and Pathik Desai, won first place. Tattnall’s team two won second place. The students on that team included Brandon Hong, Chiemeka Nzerue, Abby Oser and Sarah Goldgar, according to the release.

For the junior varsity teams in Division I, team one for Tattnall Square Academy won first place, and team two won third place. Stratford Academy came won second place. Tattnall’s team one included Noah Johnson, Avery Scott, Kaitlyn Hallman and Cade Bloodworth, and team two included Evan Carr, Carlie Epps, Kaci Paul and Martha Kate Gillis. Stratford’s team consisted of Sophia Tang, Darren Shivclat, Varnika Gaduri, and Shreya Ranabhotu, according to the release.

The Academy for Classical Education won third place in the Division II competition for junior varsity, and their students were Landon Juang, Matthew Farmer, Elizabeth McArthur and Camille Fry.

Beijun Desai, a Tattnall Square Academy student, won third place in the Division I individual competition, and Noah Johnson from Tattnall was the top scorer for the junior varisty level, according to the release.

The competition consisted of more than 230 students from 16 different schools.

Houston County Elementary Science Olympiad

The fifth annual Houston County Elementary Science Olympiad was held on Feb. 23, and Northside Elementary School won the competition followed by Hilltop Elementary and Eagle Springs.

Northside will advance to the regional competition Middle Georgia RESA Regional Elementary Science Olympiad, according to a news release.

“At Northside, we are proud to have been able to host the Science Olympiad tournament for elementary schools in Houston County for the last five years,” said Northside Elementary Principal David Sams. “Events like this not only increase our students’ interest in STEM, but also creates a genuine excitement for STEM.”

2019 IUPAC Young Observer

A Mercer University chemistry professor was chosen by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry as a 2019 Young Observer to attend the General Assembly and World Chemistry Congress.

Adam Kiefer, one of 12 Young Observers who will attend the assembly in Paris, France, held a lead role in developing and implementing methods to reduce mercury poisoning among artisinal gold miners in places like Peru and Ecuador for Mercer on Mission, according to a news release.

“I am very excited to learn more about the interface of chemistry and policy and am thankful to have this opportunity,” said Kiefer. “The only way we can tackle some of the larger scientific problems in today’s world is by ensuring that our findings are disseminated to people working in other scientific and engineering fields, as well as policymakers.”

The Young Observer program provides researchers with the opportunity to influence international science policy issues and allows them to create relationships with other scientists across the world, according to the release.

“Dr. Keifer’s selection by IUPAC as a 2019 Young Observer is a testament to the excellent work he is doing with Mercer’s students both on campus and around the world,” said Anita Olson Gustafson, dean of the College of Liberal Arts. “By representing Mercer at the General Assembly and World Chemistry Congress, he will be able to collaborate with young scientists from top institutions and build important networks of connection.”

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