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Baby grand piano among the finds at upcoming Historic Macon Flea Market

Historic Macon Flea Market turns 40

Historic Macon Foundation set to hold its 40th Annual Flea Market Nov. 3-5. Director of Engagement Rachelle Wilson says the variety is large and every item for sale has a story -- some in writing.
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Historic Macon Foundation set to hold its 40th Annual Flea Market Nov. 3-5. Director of Engagement Rachelle Wilson says the variety is large and every item for sale has a story -- some in writing.

You never know what you’ll find at the Historic Macon Foundation’s annual flea market, and this year is no exception.

Among the offerings up for grabs this weekend are a baby grand piano and a car.

The piano, made in 1924 by Kranich and Bach, was purchased by the Sisters of Mercy after they founded Mount de Sales Academy.

The piano stayed at the school for years. It fell into disuse and was going to be discarded when a former employee saved it.

Today, the baby grand is just shy of 100 years old and needs a new home.

“It is not in the best condition, but if someone really cared for it and restored it, it could be played once again,” said the foundation’s Rachelle Wilson.

The piano will be up for a silent auction at the market, which begins Friday with a preview party and runs through Sunday afternoon. Bidding on the piano will start at $400, with increases in a $50 increments.

Proceeds from the market, drawn entirely from donated items, fund the foundation’s restoration and revitalization efforts.

This year’s market, at 357 Oglethorpe St., will feature everything from furniture and housewares to electronics, artwork and, for the first time, a car.

A donated 2003 Lincoln Navigator will also be up for a silent auction with a starting bid of $2,500.

“It is in good condition, a very big car and could be used to carry or transport things,” Wilson said.

The car was donated by longtime Historic Macon volunteers Allyson and Robert Aldrich.

“Every year we donate a few items to the flea market,” Allyson Aldrich said. “We have been members for a long time and want to continue to support the (foundation’s) mission and its dedication to the preservation and revitalization of historic homes and neighborhoods.”

Aside from the larger items, Historic Macon has begun a new process of “flipping” certain items up for sale.

“We take items that we have had for some time that aren't necessarily what people are looking for and turn them into something different,” Wilson said.

The idea was pioneered by another Historic Macon volunteer, Susan DiRenzo, who has already converted a baby crib into a porch swing and an old sewing table into a new end table.

For more information on the market, go to: historicmacon.org.

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