Business

Macon doctors sing and dance in video with a message that has gone national

Doctors warn heart attack and stroke ‘ain’t no joke’

Project DASH for Doctors Against Stroke and Heart Attack performed a music video at The Medical Center, Navicent Health explaining the symptoms of a heart attack and stroke. The video became popular on Facebook.
Up Next
Project DASH for Doctors Against Stroke and Heart Attack performed a music video at The Medical Center, Navicent Health explaining the symptoms of a heart attack and stroke. The video became popular on Facebook.

A music video filmed at The Medical Center, Navicent Health, and performed by local doctors and clinicians has gone national.

The lively video, with this story at www.macon.com, is referred to as Project DASH for Doctors Against Stroke and Heart Attack, according to a release.

"Heart attack and a stroke, this stuff just ain't no joke," sings the leader of a band all dressed in scrubs. "If you know the warning signs, it could save your life in time."

The catchy tune is an original composition by local musician and composer Christopher Griffin, and Dr. Edward Clark, a pediatrician with the Beverly Knight Olson Children's Hospital, Navicent Health, was instrumental in having the song produced.

Part of the song the singers rapped while explaining the symptoms of a heart attack and stroke.

The participants volunteered to record the song, participate in the video and promote the video to try to minimize heart disease and the stroke risk of Middle Georgians. The music video was produced locally by Big Hair Productions and funded by the Navicent Health Foundation.

It was originally posted to YouTube, and it has received more than 5,700 views. On Oct. 27, it received national attention when the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association posted the video to their Facebook pages.

While the video began as a way to reach the local community and raise awareness of the warning signs of heart attack and stoke, Dr. Margaret Boltja, a neurologist and creator of the Project DASH, said they were "thrilled" that the national organizations noticed their effort.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both men and women, with no regard for race or ethnicity, according to the release. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that one in every four deaths in the U.S. is related to heart disease.

According to the American Heart Association, stroke is the fifth leading cause of death and is the leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the United States. On average, someone in the U.S. suffers a stroke every 40 seconds, someone dies of a stroke every four minutes, and nearly 800,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year.

Linda S. Morris: 744-4223, @MidGaBiz

  Comments