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Historic Macon Foundation’s flea market a resounding success

Bargain hunters flood to foundation's annual flea market Sunday

Historic Macon Foundation's Flea Market featured 50 percent off all merchandise Sunday. The market which features a wide variety of merchandise including furniture, housewares, toys, sporting goods, artwork and antiques among others. Money raised
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Historic Macon Foundation's Flea Market featured 50 percent off all merchandise Sunday. The market which features a wide variety of merchandise including furniture, housewares, toys, sporting goods, artwork and antiques among others. Money raised

After dining on Satterfield’s barbecue, with all the fixins’, and partaking of Macon Beer Company’s array of locally brewed beers, the long line of anxious shoppers settled down for an evening of marathon shopping on Nov. 3, at the Oglethorpe Street location of Historic Macon Foundation’s annual flea market. The preview party gave ticket holders the opportunity to see and buy first, on the night before the market was opened to the public.

Sustaining member of HMF, Art Howard, greeted the first crowd that entered the doors to a warehouse the size of a football field, full of furnishings, crystal, silver, linens, building materials and Christmas decorations, to name just a few of the categories. Betty Sweet Ladson, who has chaired the garden shop for years, had her space organized like a vintage boutique, an advantage of having a permanent home for the flea market — for years, storage of sale items was a chore before moving them to the present site of the sale.

A handsome sofa and leather captain’s chair caught the eye of Ed Clark, local physician, jazz man and avid supporter of the arts and of preservation in Macon. One lamp looked so perfect for her house that Kay McKenna bought it, eventually realizing it was the restored light she had donated, in pretty rough shape, a year ago. William Slocumb, owner of Ashley McLean Antiques in Ingleside Village, has priced the silver and crystal for years, and had almost sold out by the time the flea market closed at 5 p.m. on Sunday. Slocumb knows, from his vast experience, how to price these items to move them out the door.

To those people who ask why the sale is held only once a year, the answer is that the monumental task of arranging, pricing, cleaning and manning the booths for the flea market is a year round job for a group of volunteers, with Max Crook at the helm. To stage the sale more than once a year is impossible without doubling the volunteer staff that manages it. Just moving the sold items out of the warehouse on Sunday required traffic control by local law enforcement officers and the muscle of more volunteers to load the numerous trucks and cars. However, the reduction of inventory on Sunday, from the first look on Friday night, was phenomenal — people could actually walk through the aisles and pick up some bargains when the prices were slashed to half price.

This is the biggest fundraiser of the year for Historic Macon Foundation and replenishes the coffers for another year of preserving Macon’s historic treasures.

Katherine_Walden
Katherine Walden BEAU CABELL bcabell@macon.com

Celebrating the past at Vineville United Methodist Church

On Sunday, Nov. 5, All Saints Day, Nov. 1, was celebrated in churches worldwide to remember and honor family and friends that have died. At Vineville United Methodist Church, Jack Mitchener, director of the Townsend-McAfee Institute of Church Music and university organist and professor of organ in the Townsend School of Music at Mercer University, performed an organ recital on Sunday that was breathtaking and poignant, befitting a man that has been described as one of the leading concert organists of his generation.

After ending the first half of the program with Felix Mendelssohn’s Opus 65, No. 1, from Sonata in F minor, and with the audience in the sanctuary on their feet, Mitchener chose three contemporary compositions for the last half. Litanies, JA 119, from “Trois Pieces,” written by Jehan Alain, after he lost his sister in a tragic accident, was an ambitious composition that matched Mitchener’s virtuosity. It was dedicated to his late mother, who, according to the artist, considered Alain’s memorial her favorite piece, a sentiment shared by Mitchener.

After the performance, popular local artist Sterling Everett, who is known for memorializing some of Macon’s most noteworthy buildings, met members of the audience who were interested in purchasing signed and numbered prints from an original painting of the exterior of the sanctuary. The stately Greek Revival building has recently been refurbished, including the installation of new landscaping. Members can have a tangible reminder of the history of the church and of its contributions to their lives for generations.

Katherine Walden is a freelance writer and interior designer in Macon. Contact her at 478-742-2224 or kwaldenint@aol.com.

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