Home & Garden

If you want spring flowers, don’t prune camellias or loropetalum

Don’t prune loropetalum. Like azaleas, pruning now will remove most of the spring flowers.
Don’t prune loropetalum. Like azaleas, pruning now will remove most of the spring flowers. Getty Images/iStockphoto

▪ Now is the time to apply a pre-emergent to your lawn.

▪ Don’t prune camellias. These shrubs have set blooms for the fall and spring. Pruning now will reduce the number of flowers. Prune after flowering.

▪ Don’t prune loropetalum. Like azaleas, pruning now will remove most of the spring flowers.

▪ Now is the time to take cuttings of your favorite annuals for rooting. Plants that root well include coleus, begonias, salvia, impatiens and sweet potato vine. Dip the cuttings in a root hormone, and plant in a small pot of soil. Keep moist until roots begin to grow. Place them in a sunny window until next spring.

▪ Buy and plant snapdragons now. These plants, like pansies, grow best in the cooler months. Space 6 to 8 inches apart for maximum impact. Plant in groups of 20 or more. Add 3-4 inches of mulch. Use liquid fertilizer every two weeks or so.

▪ Go to the local — and not so local — nurseries and look for fall-blooming plants, trees and shrubs to add to your landscape.

▪ Keep the lawn free of leaves, which can mat down and suffocate the grass. Be sure to rake or mow regularly.

▪ Give those outdoor summer containers a new fall look! Remove dead and spent summer plants, and replace with fresh flowering fall plants. Try lantana “new gold,” perennial salvias and sages, and ornamental grasses and croton.

▪ Treat fire ant mounds now to kill the colonies before the ants disappear for the winter.

Todd Goulding provides residential landscape design consultations. Contact him at fernvalley.com or 478-345-0719.

  Comments