What would Bibb schools’ racial makeup be if everyone went to their zoned school?





December 2017



These maps show roughly where Bibb children live and which schools serve them.

Each dot stands for three children who lived within a small area called a “Census Block Group” in 2010.

While it’s not a dot on each child’s house or building, it does give a good idea of the population density and racial mix of Bibb County according to the last full U.S. Census count. (Estimates since then have a high margin of error.)

And the lines give a good idea of where elementary and high schools have long gotten their students. Except for some elementary school mergers, they have changed little in years.

Most children in the county — about 94 percent — were listed in the Census as either “black alone” or “white alone.”

Here are some other things to keep in mind:

* The maps show what the schools would look like if everyone went to their zoned school.

* There are 15 schools that are nearly all black, meaning there are fewer than 15 students, if any, in any other racial category. Most of these are concentrated in the areas where the maps show the neighborhood population as mostly black.

* There are four schools that are majority white (ACE, Skyview, Porter and Heard).

* All of the other schools are mixed but with a black majority of enrollment. This includes schools like Howard middle and high, Springdale and Carter, which are all in areas where the map shows a majority white population.

Read more about the data and sources.

Elementary School zones

1 dot = 3 kids aged 5-9 in 2010

  • black
  • white
  • other race or multiracial

High School zones

1 dot = 3 kids aged 15-17 in 2010

  • black
  • white
  • other race or multiracial