Bulldogs Beat

Georgia tracking players’ on-field movement with GPS devices

Georgia receiver Reggie Davis (81), going against Malkom Parrish (14), has a black patch on his jersey as the program is tracking his movement on the field with a GPS system.
Georgia receiver Reggie Davis (81), going against Malkom Parrish (14), has a black patch on his jersey as the program is tracking his movement on the field with a GPS system. Georgia Sports Communications

ATHENS -- Georgia is using GPS tracking devices to monitor player performance during practice.

The goal is for the coaching staff to monitor how players are responding to various workloads throughout an individual session as well as the entire preseason. Selected players Georgia’s monitoring have black patches sewn on the backs of their practice jerseys just over the number. It’s the first year the Bulldogs have implemented this kind of study.

“What it’s doing is giving us an idea of the volume of running, how much distance these guys are traveling, what speed are they traveling,” Georgia head coach Mark Richt said. “You learn a lot about the volume of work they’re doing and we’re still learning how to use them and we’re also still learning how to use the data to help us because we really don’t have anything to compare it to.”

Richt said that while they’re unsure what the results will ultimately show, they do think it can be beneficial in areas such as injury prevention.

“If you had a really good year in a lot of those areas you may gauge that as your point of reference for the future and try to keep it somewhere in that range,” RIcht said. “On the other hand, if you have a lot of injuries, a lot of pulls then you might say we’re going a little too far. Or if you find out that after period 19 or after 3-point however many miles you ran that day, you might adjust some things and change your practice habits to help these guys.”

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