Letters to the Editor

This is Viewpoints for Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Carl Vinson VA Medical Center in Dublin
Carl Vinson VA Medical Center in Dublin

Trouble?

In response to Tommy Parker, I think it was childish to quibble over the location of a comment, e.g. “the middle of the page’ versus “ “below the fold,” rather than give an intelligent response. Yep, there’s trouble in the village!

James A. Graf,

Warner Robins

VA getting better

I was pleased to see the article by Sen. Johnny Isakson providing information that is ongoing in The Senate Veteran Affairs Committee. Having served for 12 years in the House Veterans Committee when I was a member of Congress, I know how difficult it is to move legislation to become law even when there is good bipartisanship in the committee and the Congress. Overcoming resistance in The VA bureaucracy in Washington D.C. is always a challenge.

Sen. Isakson addressed several areas in which benefits to veterans are getting better. As a part time employee at The Community Mental Health Center of Middle Georgia here in Dublin, I am a liaison to The Carl Vinson VA Medical Center and see first hand how veterans are benefiting from the activities of the congressional committees and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs.

If you were to ride down Veterans Boulevard in front of The VA here you would be impressed by all the activity. Come inside and be even more impressed — vast parking areas for the outpatient clinic, new outpatient mental health clinic under construction and the expansion of other facilities for services. My home has been next door to the VA for more than 60 years and I have never seen this much activity.

There will always be challenges to providing services to veterans that they have earned and been promised, but those challenges are being better met now thanks to the Congress and also to the VA staff here led by the director, Maryalice Morro.

J. Roy Rowland, M.D.

Dublin

What’s wrong?

In her letter published on Jan. 17, Ashley P. Hurt joins the left wing, destroy-Trump hysteria over an incident that may or may not have happened. It was reported that our president may have used what some people considered a profanity when he called a crap-hole country a crap-hole country. What’s wrong with that? How refreshing to have someone in the White House with the gumption to tell it like it is. And I’m pretty sure that Sen. David Perdue accurately reported what he heard.

Jerry Norris,

Warner Robins

‘Be thankful’

Hey, you Georgia fans! At the beginning of the 2017 football season, we were expecting the Bulldogs to win the SEC East and lose to Alabama in the SEC Championship game, making them the No. 2 team in the SEC. Instead, they won the SEC Championship and (narrowly) lost to Alabama in the National Title game, making them the No. 2 team in the nation. As the song says, “It’s a waste of time to worry over things that they have not. Be thankful for the things they’ve got.” They’ve got a great team, great coaches and a great recruiting class for 2018. Go Dawgs!

Charlie Adams,

Fort Valley

Constitutional authority

Walter Williams’ column, “Constitutional ignorance – perhaps contempt” was one of the best descriptors of the current state of the American voter in recent publication. The answer to his question about the importance of the Electoral College and Hillary Clinton’s loss in the last election has to be ignorance, because there apparently aren’t enough Americans with knowledge enough of our founding documents to even have contempt for requirements therein. The times have changed and we need to get educated again.

George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison (who was the majority author of the Constitution) had an idea to found a national university to teach things Americans needed to know to be successful citizens and leaders in this new country. President Washington even left the greatest portion of his estate outside his family to the founding of the school.

In an effort to honor Washington’s bequest, President Madison submitted a bill for the government to sell some land and use the money to complete the school. But he was told by a congressman (Mitchell, Ga.) that the Constitution does not give the government the power to do that. He was stopped by those who also knew the Constitution on the basis that his bill was outside the authority of the document he had written and that they had all approved.

In contrast, when Rep. Nancy Pelosi was asked, “Where, specifically does the Constitution grant Congress the authority to enact an individual health insurance mandate?” her vitriolic, derisive response (which can still be found online) was, “Are you serious? Are you serious?” It was as if to say, “What does the Constitution have to do with what we want to do?” It’s not contempt for our Constitution, but ignorance that she, Clinton and their ilk are counting on in order to establish and maintain their political power.

Dan Topolewski,

Kathleen

One immigration idea

It seems to me the U.S. political parties need to get their act together, especially about admitting outsiders and those living in the U.S. illegally. Since they cannot agree on the numbers of immigrants admitted to the country and from what countries, why not stop all visa programs — for years if necessary — until Congress and our president can come together and evaluate all immigrant programs.

In my opinion, as long as we have one able bodied unemployed U.S. citizen suitable for employment in each category, be it highly skilled, middle skilled, low skilled and no skills at all, then consider immigrants with such skills applicable to positions needed regardless of their country of origin.

Regardless what President Trump said or did not say, it is outrageous we have countries complaining that the U.S. will not admit citizens from their country. It is our country. Don’t all countries have immigration policies they follow? Who are we to tell other countries who they should or should not allow as immigrants.

Faye W. Tanner,

Macon

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