Letters to the Editor

This is Viewpoints for Tuesday, November 21, 2017

House Republicans, including House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif., left, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., fourth from right, and House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas, fifth from right, wait to start a news conference following a vote on tax reform on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017. Republicans passed a near $1.5 trillion package overhauling corporate and personal taxes through the House.
House Republicans, including House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif., left, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., fourth from right, and House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas, fifth from right, wait to start a news conference following a vote on tax reform on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017. Republicans passed a near $1.5 trillion package overhauling corporate and personal taxes through the House. AP

More not less

We know what the corporate tax cut will be. The rate will be 20 percent. Current loopholes will remain. Congress may add one or more. We do not know what the individual tax cut will be. Will there be three or more brackets? What will the rates be? What deductions will be available? What tax credits will be available? Will deductions be lower in the future? Will deductions be offset by the loss of tax credits? Will one bracket benefit more than others? Therefore, an individual’s tax bracket is important. What is the middle class bracket? Is it $70,000 to $200,000?

Taxpayers will be able to submit their tax return on a one-page form. But because of the jumble of deductions and credits, taxpayers will have to fill out several work sheets before they can submit their one-page return. The question is, will individual taxpayers have more or less money? By the time the House and the Senate resolve their differences, some individual taxpayers will end up paying more.

Jim Costello,

Perry

Buy locally

A good way to prevent packages from being taken from one’s porch or steps is to buy locally. Doing so also adds to the local tax income and helps to prevent closings of Sears, Penney’s, Target, K-Mart, etc. Closings add too much to local unemployment with all of its complex consequences. Merry Christmas!

Al Diboll,

Macon

‘Art of a Deal’

In the Nov. 16 edition of The Telegraph, reported by Linda Morris, the $565 million to inject into Middle Georgia’s industries came as surprise not only to The Telegraph, but to me as well. It would appear that someone has read Donald Trump’s book, “The Art of a Deal” and acted on it. In order for progress to flourish, capital investment is a must, backed up with a business plan to assure longevity. The joint venture by community entities has given assurances that the Industrial Authority would be comfortable enough to allow floating bonds for heavy investment. With finger crossed, the taxpayer can only pray that the player deontology is of such that Macon-Bibb County can prosper.

Daniel E. Lee,

Macon

Whose responsibility?

Fred Gunter complained about the city and county not doing enough for young people for jobs. I didn’t know it was a city or county responsibility to furnish jobs. Nor did I know that the city and county’s job to entertain these people. If you look at his letter, Gunter is advocating either for continued welfare, socialism or communism.

Of course mostly national companies are not going to pour profits into the city. Companies have stockholders, we have retirement funds tied up in national companies, so do many people. Should stockholders not get returns so the otherwise unemployable can get recreation facilities?

Can Gunter give us more than vague solutions? Locally owned businesses and mom and pop stores cannot pay anymore than what the big corporations can. So what do we gain? You want to make “the Big dogs” to know that they have to work with “us” and give people who deserve it an opportunity? That sounds odd because he complained about people not being able to pass background checks and not completing high school. Whose fault is that? Petty crimes? Define please. I would venture to say that if he were a victim of a petty crime, he wouldn’t think it is so petty.

Gunter whines about hard to get to locations? Now what? Give them cars. When I was in high school, I would get out in the afternoon and walk 38 blocks to a job. If I missed the last bus I walked back at 11:30 p.m. Is that too much to ask or do we owe these “petty criminals” a bus or a taxi?

He has a lot of complaints. How about some solutions. Go ahead, take on city hall, Amazon, Tractor Supply, FedEx. Let us know how that works out.

Jim Huber,

Centerville

‘Trickle up’

Dear Senator Isakson: I’m writing because I believe you may consider voting yes for the current tax reform bill —something that a quarter of the nation endorses and more than half reject.

Ironically, conservatives (including yourself) have seemingly forever decried the ballooning national debt. In all likelihood this bill will be a budget buster — and do little to improve the lives of most of us who live in the real world. Supporting this legislation appears to be a wretched political calculation. A party that will pass anything just to pass something is still impotent. Frankly, this is simply one more issue that causes most Americans to find their government just short of disgusting.

Care for a thought to really invigorate the economy, not to mention your constituent’s lives? Target the majority of tax reduction to those on the bottom (paying) rungs of the income tax ladder. These multi-millions will likely spend every dime of their new found cash on items previously desired but could not afford. This expansive spending (the lifeblood of capitalism) will “trickle up” the enterprise chain and enhance the well being of owners and stockholders as well.

H.D. Linton,

Warner Robins

Feed Center

On Saturday Nov 18, The Feed Center under the direction of Pastor Al and Chywana Sanders and Alton Howard oversaw another impressive Thanksgiving food giveaway in Fort Valley, “Where Caring is a Way of Life.”

Many valley residents were loaded up with life-sustaining food, both physical and spiritual. Volunteers and recipients all, enjoyed each others company, plates of hot food, free gifts, and lively music from the master DJ. Equally impressive were the large group of young people helping out; Peach County Trojan varsity football players and many FVSU students among them. They were good-matured, friendly and helpful. Their coaches, teachers and mentors are to be congratulated for a job well done. The future of the “Valley” is in good hands.

Greg and Kay Whitley,

Fort Valley

Idiot control

Kudos to John Boyd: Dear John will you please let us know what local business that was in your letter titled “The Crazies” in Sunday’s Telegraph. I personally would like to avoid that business for my own safety. Here again, just another example of complete idiocy, an open invitation for the next idiot who decides to do his thing and slaughter innocent citizens. We have enough gun control what we need is more idiot control.

George Scoville,

Macon

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