Letters to the Editor

This is Viewpoints for Sunday, November 12, 2017

The Healthcare.gov website is seen on a laptop computer, in Washington. Former Obama administration officials say they're launching a private campaign to encourage people to sign up for coverage under the Affordable Care Act. Open enrollment began Nov. 1. The Trump administration slashed "Obamacare's" ad budget, as well as grants to outside organizations that are supposed to help consumers sign up.
The Healthcare.gov website is seen on a laptop computer, in Washington. Former Obama administration officials say they're launching a private campaign to encourage people to sign up for coverage under the Affordable Care Act. Open enrollment began Nov. 1. The Trump administration slashed "Obamacare's" ad budget, as well as grants to outside organizations that are supposed to help consumers sign up. AP

Any faster service?

Just read the article about the new Houston bus depot, “Houston school district rolls out $6 million bus facility.” It reminded me of a rock & roll album performed by Joe Walsh, titled “So What!” I echo the same salutation to Houston County since it takes this school system well over one hour to get my grandson home and it’s only one and a half miles to his house.

Doubt this unveiling does anything to improve its service to the customers.

Bobby Komlo,

Macon

‘Goodbye Marjane’

Some residents may be familiar with a little street tht runs between Zebulon Road and Forsyth Road named after two sisters Margie and Jane —Marjane Drive. My husband and I lived there for over 46 years. When we moved there in 1972 it was a little dirt street with a few neighbors on each side. The snow of 1973 wreaked havoc leaving us and probably others stuck in our driveways for several days. Now we have a paved street with cityu sewage, but some of the charm remains.

We remember our first neighbors, the Weeks, or as my daughter put it when she was two or three said, “I like the Weeps, they have good cookies.” One of our newest neighbors, Nancy and Woody, have been a great help with little projects since my husband passed away last November.

My late husband, Walter, was referred to by some as the Mayor of Marjane. I bequeath the title to Mr. Kelley down the street. He’s a frequent contributor to the letters to the editor. We will miss our neighbors as my daughter and I have decided to downsize a bit. I would like to say “Thank You,” for the memories. Goodbye Marjane.

Sherry Johnson,

Macon

Obamacare not dead

One of the most interesting results of Tuesday’s election was the referendum in Maine overwhelmingly approving the expansion of Medicaid as authorized under the Affordable Care Act, an approval that came after the state’s Republican governor had vetoed it five times. (Notably, few of those voters will be covered by Medicaid themselves.)

Similar initiatives are being launched in Idaho and Utah, and Virginia voters identified health care as their No. 1 concern. Coupled with the failure of the Congress to repeal and replace the ACA, this evidence of public support for extending health care to those who would otherwise do without should add weight to a nascent effort in our own state to follow suit: not that those considering expansion like the program, but because failure to do so has already and will continue to jeopardize the financial viability of Georgia’s rural hospitals.

Medicaid is not a poverty program — it’s a health-care program, and most of the adults its expansion would serve, work, but work at jobs that do not provide health insurance. Medicaid expansion in Georgia would encourage proactive, preventive medical care, rather than the much more expensive and much less effective acute or emergency care — the costs of which the public ends up absorbing anyway. Sick people can’t work.

Georgia also declined to establish a statewide exchange for citizens seeking individual policies under the ACA (or “Obamacare”), but the federal exchange is open for business until December 15; that’s when enrollment for 2018 will end. There has been so much in the news about ending “Obamacare” that many people who could benefit from its provisions think it is no longer available or will be so expensive as to be unavailable. In most instances that is not the case.

Check healthcare.gov, or find multiple venues for accessing information by googling “healthcare in Georgia 2018.” Many options to explore come up, and there are phone numbers to call for assistance. But don’t delay; enrollment is only open six weeks this year.

Nancy Anderson,

Macon

Well-armed, well-trained

Let me begin by saying that I believe it is the right of every mentally competent adult American citizen to own as many guns as he or she can afford. Most of my weapons are old, but are still very functional and I have a concealed carry permit for my hand guns.

I still remember the copious ridicule heaped upon the Georgia Legislature by the liberal left media over the “guns in church” laws passed several years ago, before the recent massacres in churches and elsewhere. The most recent Texas massacre was partly thwarted by a good guy with a good gun who was not afraid to come barefooted to the aid of his friends and neighbors.

I watched a TV interview last evening with a local pastor who said that he disliked guns and the thought of having them in church, but in light of recent events, he is now thinking of having one or more well-trained armed men at every church meeting to protect the women and children.

This is not a new idea. In the famous painting “Pilgrims going to church” by George Henry Boughton (1833), six of the 15 persons depicted in the painting are carrying guns for their own protection. In the recent Texas church shooting it took five minutes for the police to arrive but the armed barefoot man from across the street saved the day. How many fewer people would have died had there been just one well-armed, well-trained person in that church?

It is now obvious to me that we must, at all times, be prepared to protect ourselves, at home and away. The pilgrims did it, should we now do any less?

Charles T. Wolf Jr.,

Macon

Setting Truman’s record straight

In his letter to the editor, Richard Jones claimed that in 1945 President Truman had sent a memo to Gen. McArthur and Adm. Nimitz defining the term “political correctness.” Like Jones, Harry Truman is my one of my favorite Democratic presidents. Because of that, it is important to defend his honor when incorrect things are attributed to him. The memo Jones attributed to President Truman in his letter “Trumanisms” is false. The conclusive evidence of this is the term “mainstream media” used in the supposed memo. This term began to be use in the 1980s.

Or in the words of my favorite Republican president, Abraham Lincoln, “everything you read on the Internet isn’t necessarily so.”

Art Howard,

Macon

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