Houston & Peach

Warner Robins Council approves new personnel policies

From left, Warner Robins City Council members Tim Thomas, Clifford Holmes and Mike Davis cast a vote at Monday's meeting.
From left, Warner Robins City Council members Tim Thomas, Clifford Holmes and Mike Davis cast a vote at Monday's meeting. wcrenshaw@macon.com

The City Council approved new policies Monday that affect when employees can retire and how much time they have to report that they have been arrested.

They also discussed a change to allow new employees to be promoted during their probationary period but will vote on that proposal at the next meeting.

The council approved a previously discussed policy that would allow employees to retire after 30 years of service, regardless of age.

The council also approved another new personnel policy that tightened the time an employee has to report an arrest. Previously, employees were required to report an arrest within five days, but the council gave department heads the ability to cut that to two days.

The change came at the request of Police Chief Brett Evans. He said it didn’t stem from any recent arrests of officers, but there have been issues in the past and he wanted a tighter timeline for reporting.

The change in the retirement policy came after an extended discussion during the precouncil meeting. Councilman Chuck Shaheen ultimately voted for the measure, but he expressed concerns about additional health insurance costs it could incur.

Human Resources Director Bryan Fobbus said if retired employees get another job, then they are required to make the insurance from that job their primary insurance.

The council discussed a third significant personnel change, but planned to vote on it at the next meeting. The original proposal was to change the probationary period for new employees from one year to six months. Mayor Randy Toms said that is to allow the ability to promote an employee sooner.

However, the council agreed to change course when Evans offered a different idea. He suggested leaving the probationary period at a year but allowing for employees still on probation to be promoted. Council members said they liked that idea.

“If they are good enough to promote, the probationary period should be irrelevant,” Evans said.

That would also allow new employees to be promoted even before the six months period.

Wayne Crenshaw: 478-256-9725, @WayneCrenshaw1

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