FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2018 file photo, Qin Jinzhou deposits an embryo into a microplate after injecting it with injecting Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA in a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. On March 13, 2019, an international group of scientists and ethicists are calling for a temporary global ban on making babies with edited genes. It’s the latest reaction to last November’s announcement that gene-edited twins had been born in China. That development was widely criticized as risky and unethical.
FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2018 file photo, Qin Jinzhou deposits an embryo into a microplate after injecting it with injecting Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA in a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. On March 13, 2019, an international group of scientists and ethicists are calling for a temporary global ban on making babies with edited genes. It’s the latest reaction to last November’s announcement that gene-edited twins had been born in China. That development was widely criticized as risky and unethical. Mark Schiefelbein AP Photo
FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2018 file photo, Qin Jinzhou deposits an embryo into a microplate after injecting it with injecting Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA in a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. On March 13, 2019, an international group of scientists and ethicists are calling for a temporary global ban on making babies with edited genes. It’s the latest reaction to last November’s announcement that gene-edited twins had been born in China. That development was widely criticized as risky and unethical. Mark Schiefelbein AP Photo