Opinion Columns & Blogs

December 8, 2013 12:00 AM

OEDEL: Food for Macon’s soul

Macon has profound geographic appeal, enough so that Native Americans lived here for thousands of years until the remaining Muscogee Creeks were relocated -- mostly to Oklahoma -- after federal passage of the Indian Removal Act of 1830. A proposal is now being actively pressed to make the wild areas southeast of downtown along the Ocmulgee River a national park and preserve, expanding the Ocmulgee National Monument. That’s roughly the area recognized since 1997 as the Muscogee Creeks’ traditional cultural properties.

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