Storm evacuees stand on the side of Highway 290 that became a parking lot as people attempt to flee the approach of Hurricane Rita in Houston on Thursday, Sept. 22, 2005. State and local officials have taken a beating for waiting until millions of Hurricane Rita evacuees had been trapped in gridlock for more than 24 hours before they opened Houston's major highways to one-way outbound traffic. But the Texas Department of Transportation says it wasn't easy to convert 487 miles of highway, including two interstates, to one-way traffic.
Storm evacuees stand on the side of Highway 290 that became a parking lot as people attempt to flee the approach of Hurricane Rita in Houston on Thursday, Sept. 22, 2005. State and local officials have taken a beating for waiting until millions of Hurricane Rita evacuees had been trapped in gridlock for more than 24 hours before they opened Houston's major highways to one-way outbound traffic. But the Texas Department of Transportation says it wasn't easy to convert 487 miles of highway, including two interstates, to one-way traffic. Ron Heflin AP
Storm evacuees stand on the side of Highway 290 that became a parking lot as people attempt to flee the approach of Hurricane Rita in Houston on Thursday, Sept. 22, 2005. State and local officials have taken a beating for waiting until millions of Hurricane Rita evacuees had been trapped in gridlock for more than 24 hours before they opened Houston's major highways to one-way outbound traffic. But the Texas Department of Transportation says it wasn't easy to convert 487 miles of highway, including two interstates, to one-way traffic. Ron Heflin AP

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