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  • How did Bibb County schools get to where they are today?

    Thelma Dillard gives her perspective on Macon's school integration history in this radio segment from GPB Macon. Dillard was an educator for 44 years and is a current school board member. She is one of seven children in the Bivins family, who were instrumental in the community's desegregation. Her sister was the lead plaintiff in Middle Georgia's first desegregation lawsuit, Shirley Bivins vs. Board of Education.

Thelma Dillard gives her perspective on Macon's school integration history in this radio segment from GPB Macon. Dillard was an educator for 44 years and is a current school board member. She is one of seven children in the Bivins family, who were instrumental in the community's desegregation. Her sister was the lead plaintiff in Middle Georgia's first desegregation lawsuit, Shirley Bivins vs. Board of Education. GPB Macon
Thelma Dillard gives her perspective on Macon's school integration history in this radio segment from GPB Macon. Dillard was an educator for 44 years and is a current school board member. She is one of seven children in the Bivins family, who were instrumental in the community's desegregation. Her sister was the lead plaintiff in Middle Georgia's first desegregation lawsuit, Shirley Bivins vs. Board of Education. GPB Macon

Journey to school integration was painful, prolonged process

March 31, 2017 04:16 PM

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  • He was one of the only black children in his school, and this was his experience

    Kenneth Williams recalls how his father voluntarily integrated his sons into Bibb County’s Pearl Stephens Elementary School. Williams said he and his brothers used to run home from school to avoid being drawn into fights with white children, until their father said, “You're gonna go to that school, so you might as well stand up and fight because you're going back!” Williams is a member of Central High School’s class of 1977 and was among the first Macon children to spend all or most of their school years in integrated schools. He spoke at his 40-year class reunion at Healy Point Country Club, Nov. 4, 2017.