This illustration made available by the European Southern Observatory in 2014 shows shows dust surrounding a supernova explosion. On Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2017, astronomers reported that a star 500 million light-years away exploded in 1954 and apparently again in 2014. The research confounds scientists who thought they knew how dying stars ticked.
This illustration made available by the European Southern Observatory in 2014 shows shows dust surrounding a supernova explosion. On Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2017, astronomers reported that a star 500 million light-years away exploded in 1954 and apparently again in 2014. The research confounds scientists who thought they knew how dying stars ticked. ESO via AP M. Kornmesser
This illustration made available by the European Southern Observatory in 2014 shows shows dust surrounding a supernova explosion. On Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2017, astronomers reported that a star 500 million light-years away exploded in 1954 and apparently again in 2014. The research confounds scientists who thought they knew how dying stars ticked. ESO via AP M. Kornmesser

Stellar encore: Dying star keeps coming back big time

November 08, 2017 02:29 PM

UPDATED November 08, 2017 02:31 PM

More Videos

  • In 90 Seconds: Thanksgiving 2017, by the numbers

    How much turkey will you eat and money will you spend this Thanksgiving? Here are some predicted stats to reassure you that most Americans enjoy a big feast, Thanksgiving football and Black Friday shopping.