Family

Family

Ask Mr. Dad: Is it OK to defend your family with martial arts?

Dear Mr. Dad: Every day there's a story in the news about violence - whether it's a terrorist, a mass shooter, or some other nut job. I feel bad for the victims of this violence, but I'm also feeling extremely helpless. I'm thinking about signing all of us up for some kind of martial arts lessons but I don't want to teach my kids to be violent. I read in one of your columns that you have a background in martial arts. Do you recommend a particular style?

Family

Lori Borgman: Stay calm and color on

The only coloring books I had as a kid were of Cinderella. When I heard that six of the 20 top-selling books on Amazon are adult coloring books, I thought they were updates of Cinderella these many years later.

Family

Ex-etiquette: It's not about you it's about the business of raising a child

Q: My husband has an eight-year-old son from a one night stand that happened years before we met. Because the parents were never together - no marriage, no divorce, no relationship at all, does that change the need to follow the rules of good ex-etiquette? While I understand co-parenting philosophically and we are cordial at the child's sporting events, I don't think "the rules" necessarily apply to us. Are there any exceptions for this scenario?

Family

App review: Exploding Kittens app is a potentially great but flawed version of the popular card game

Parents need to know that Exploding Kittens is an app based on the popular card game. Despite the name, it's not an especially violent title and does not feature any sexual references or foul language; it's important to note that the goal of the game involves trying to get someone else to get the exploding kitten card, so younger players who aren't as ready for this kind of competition may have hard feelings when people deliberately take their cards, etc.

Family

Family Meals Matter: Healthy hearts, happy stomachs

February is American Heart Month! Take care of those you love by planning and preparing balanced meals that follow the DASH eating pattern. Proven to reduce high blood pressure without medication, a DASH eating pattern emphasizes a variety of low-fat dairy foods, vegetables and fruits, with reduced sodium and saturated fats. The great news is this eating pattern is rich in flavor for happy stomachs as well as healthy hearts. For more about DASH, visit http://www.healthyeating.org/Healthy-Eating/Healthy-Living/Heart-Health.aspx

Family

Project: Templates help kids create handmade Valentine's Day cards

Your little love bugs will dig matching up their favorite party favors with our printable templates! In just an hour or two, they'll have sweet, customized cards for every kid in the class! Find templates for all of these valentines at familyfunmag.com/printables. We found all the party favors featured here at ustoy.com and partycity.com.

Family

Child Sense: Strengthening your family bond with Valentine's Day

Valentine's Day is often regarded as just being for those that are newly coupled but it can be a great excuse to celebrate with all your loved ones, including your children. Instead of it being a day of miscommunicated words or dinners resulting in unmet expectation, Valentine's Day can be a special and unique day that allows the whole family to show they love and appreciation those special people in our lives. By understanding each others dominant sense you can find the perfect way to communicate your feelings in a thoughtful and successful way thereby strengthening the bond you have together.

Family

Lean In: Ellenore Angelidis, EU legal director

I was raised by Dutch immigrant parents who survived harrowing WWII experiences. They helped weave a healthy work ethic and the need to persevere through obstacles into the fabric of my upbringing. In the years that followed, I was further tested; some of the biggest challenges came in the form of cancer followed by a job elimination in my late thirties.

Family

Game review: 'The Witness,' challenging and rewarding puzzle video game

Parents need to know that "The Witness" is a downloadable first-person exploration game set on an island full of hundreds of maze puzzles. There's no violence, sexuality, language, or mature themes of any kind, though a few lines of text reference alcohol in terms of metaphor. Themes within the largely abstract narrative include perspective - in both the physical and figurative senses - and perception, challenging players to consider how they think, how they learn, and how they know what they know. These themes encourage players to be both analytical and critical of the world around them. Parents should also note that this is an extremely difficult game with no instructions, and that it could prove frustrating to less patient temperaments. Players are intended to work out everything, from the first puzzle to the last, on their own without a single hint or even a word of explanation.

Family

Sounds for seniors

SEATTLE - Most people know Louie Richmond as the quick-witted public-relations man behind a number of Seattle-area hotels and restaurants.

Family

Parents offer advice on avoiding scalding accidents

MIAMI - As 3-year-old Vincent Zou's parents were preparing a Chinese hot pot dish in their Miramar, Fla., home, his father put a pot of boiling water on the kitchen island. Little Vincent was playing nearby and accidentally tipped the pot, bringing hot water cascading onto his chin, neck and chest.

TV

TV time: Make screen time count with TV that can actually teach kids quality lessons

When kids' TV shows bill themselves as educational, lots of parents take their word for it. But how many of these shows are backed by childhood-development principles, quality research, and an understanding of how kids learn best from media? Actually, quite a few. From social-emotional learning to STEM subjects, this is a golden age of choice for preschool TV. Behind the scenes, many kids' shows are providing richer screen-time experiences by the pros who know how best to reach kids.

Family

Your guide to safer booster seats

According to recent research from the University of Michigan, many kids' booster seats aren't being used correctly. Here, study author Michelle L. Macy, M.D., a pediatric emergency medicine physician, explains how to buckle up better.

Family

9 social media features that are cause for concern � no matter which app your kid is using

It can be hard to keep up with the latest apps that kids are using. Just when you've figured out how to talk to your kids about Facebook, they've moved on to Instagram or Snapchat. But here's the deal: Even when new apps come along, adding new features such as the ability to disappear or track your location, they're often not that different from other apps. And if you know what to look for, you can help your kid avoid some common social media pitfalls such as drama, cyberbullying and oversharing.