Classic cars on display at museum’s annual show

awoolen@macon.comOctober 9, 2013 

WingsWheels

Visitors look at a selection of Mopar cars during last year’s Wings and Wheels Car Show at the Museum of Aviation.

JASON VORHEES/THE SUN NEWS — jvorhees@macon.com Buy Photo

WARNER ROBINS -- Shiny cars, child-sized racing and playing poker by automobile are just some of the things happening during the two-day Wings and Wheels Car, Truck and Motorcycle Show at the Museum of Aviation on Friday and Saturday.

The show is headed by the museum’s head of marketing, Bob Dubiel.

“I’m a car nut,” Dubiel explained.

He has owned many classic cars and attributes his love of the automobile with growing up in the ’50s and ’60s.

His favorite is the Chevrolet Corvette, which is what he currently drives.

Friday night will feature a poker fun run and a cruise-in. Particpants start at the museum between 6 and 7 p.m. and are charged $10 a hand. They will go to six businesses to retrieve cards for their poker hand. The evening ends at Steak ‘n Shake, where there will be a DJ and 60-80 cars. The cruise-in is expected to start at 8 p.m.

Saturday’s events include the car show, where about 275 are expected to enter. There will be 110 trophies given away in an assortment of categories including the Commander’s Choice Award and Best in Show.

The Batmobile will also make a reappearance at the show.

There will be a sale corral as well for those who wish to try to sell their car during the show Saturday.

A 1978 Ford Bronco monster truck named Standing Tall with 6-foot tall tires will make laps around the museum for a fee.

Runway races for children ages 3-8 will take place from 10 a.m.-noon on battery operated Yamaha Raptors, provided by Wal-Mart. One of the small 4-wheelers will be auctioned off in the silent auction.

Along with the 4-wheeler, a framed replica of John Wayne’s rifle as well as a remote control Corvette will be in the auction.

This car show is a fundraiser for the museum.

Dubiel hopes to make about $10,000 in profit.

“It’s become a labor of love,” he said.

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