WRHS students talk politics with Isakson in Skype session

awoolen@macon.comMay 15, 2013 

Warner Robins High School students in AP U.S. Government Skype with Sen. Johnny Isakson on March 7.

WARNER ROBINS -- Sen. Johnny Isakson fielded some tough questions last week, but not from anyone on Capitol Hill.

Students from Warner Robins High School held a Skype session with Isakson on May 7 and asked the Georgia Republican questions online via a webcam during a half-hour talk.

It was the first Skype session Isakson has done with Houston County students.

Nick Wilcox is an avid news watcher and wanted to know if Isakson had details about the attack in Benghazi, Libya.

“There is still more information,” said the 68-year-old senator.

Because some of the specifics about the attack are unclear, Wilcox said he wondered if the senator could provide more details.

Wilcox, a senior, plans to attend the Naval Academy in the fall. His father is in the Air Force.

“I just wanted to get that off my chest,” he said about why he chose the question.

Abby Butikofer, a junior, asked how Isakson became a senator. After taking Advanced Placement U.S. government, the 16-year-old said she is fascinated about how the law works.

“It is really intriguing, and I definitely want to keep it as an option,” she said about a career in politics.

Press Secretary Lauren Culbertson said Butikofer’s question was typical of what the senator fields while Skyping with students.

“Sen. Isakson loves meeting with students,” she said.

While education has been one of Isakson’s top priorities since becoming involved in politics in 1976, it is difficult for him to visit schools in Georgia while he is in Washington.

Isakson has been “Skyping” with students since September 2011. He has conducted 24 Skype sessions.

Louis Leskosky, gifted teacher of the year for Houston County, said he tries to do something special for his students every year.

“I wanted to buoy their spirits,” he said.

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