County info: Crawford, Jones, Monroe and Twiggs

May 5, 2013 

Crawford County, the 55th county formed in Georgia, was created in 1822 from Creek Indian lands and part of Houston County. Later, parts of Macon and Talbot counties were added. The county was named for William H. Crawford, who was the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury when the county was created and was a candidate for president in 1824.

The county has one active municipality, Roberta. It is named for the daughter of Hiram McCrary, who gave and sold land for the settlement.

The county seat, Knoxville, received a charter in 1825, but it was one of 187 inactive municipalities to lose their charters in 1995 as a result of a 1993 act of the General Assembly. The routing of the railroad through Roberta induced most of the inhabitants to move a mile away to that town, which was incorporated in 1890.

Nineteen archaeological sites in the county have been filed with the State Archaeological Office. Of particular significance is the Creek habitation area along the Flint River.

CRAWFORD COUNTY GOVERNMENT

Crawford County Commission, 1011 U.S. 341 North, Roberta, (478) 836-3782

ROBERTA CITY GOVERNMENT

City Hall, 123 E. Agency St., Roberta, (478) 836-3119

Voter registration

Election Supervisor, 1011 U.S. 341 North, Room 14, (478) 836-1877, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays

Auto tags

Tax Commissioner, 1011 U.S. 341 North, Suite 19, Roberta, (478) 836-3575, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays

Emergency numbers

Sheriff’s Office, 911 or (478) 836-3116

Roberta Police Department, 911 or (478) 836-3119

Fire Department, 911 or (478) 836-3766

Ambulance Service, (478) 836-3766

POPULATION

2010 Census: 12,630

Change, 2000 to 2010: 1.1 percent

White: 74.6 percent

Black: 22.3 percent

Hispanic: 2.4 percent

EDUCATION

High school or better: 78.7 percent

Bachelor’s or better: 13.6 percent

Public high school graduates, 2011: 81

Graduation rate, 2011: 42.3 percent

Public school enrollment, October 2012: 1,852

Eligible for HOPE scholarship: 23.8 percent

Enrolled, white: 69.8 percent

Enrolled, black: 23.4 percent

ECONOMICS

Median household income, 2011: $41,855

People below poverty level: 23.9 percent

Unemployment rate, December 2012: 9.3

Civilian labor force, December 2012: 6,289

HEALTH

Births per 1,000 people, 2009: 11

Deaths per 1,000 people, 2009: 10

Births to unwed mothers, 2009: 49.6 percent

Teen pregnancies per 1,000 girls aged 10 to 19: 30.6

People per physician, 2008: 6,270

Uninsured, less than age 65: 21.9 percent

TANF recipients, Fiscal 2010: 1 percent

PHYSICAL

Land: 326.5 square miles

Land in farms: 18.1 percent

Road mileage, unpaved, 2010: 28.8 percent

Sources: Telegraph analysis, Georgia Statistics System, U.S. Census Bureau, Georgia Department of Labor, Georgia Department of Education

Jones County was the 30th county created in Georgia, in 1807. Originally part of Baldwin County, it was named for James Jones, a prominent Savannah attorney, Georgia legislator and U.S. Congressman.

The county seat since 1905 and the only incorporated municipality is Gray. The town was originally known as James in honor of the man whose land it was on, James. H. Blount. It was changed to Gray to honor James Madison Gray, a major financier of the Confederacy.

The Ocmulgee River, the restored Jarrell Plantation and the Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge are located in the county.

Jones County was the site of the first iron foundry in Georgia, founded in 1820 by Samuel Griswold from Connecticut to produce cotton gins. His factories and properties were destroyed by the Union forces because he made guns and ammunition for the Confederacy.

Old Clinton, built in 1809, was a center for New England settlers whose influence is reflected in the architecture of the town. The houses stand close to the streets, which ran out from a central square. In 1860, this was the county seat and the fourth largest city in the state. Clinton was one of 187 inactive municipalities to lose its charter in 1995, as a result of a 1993 act of the General Assembly. It had lost most of its population to Gray in the 1890s when the residents rejected having the railroad pass through.

JONES COUNTY GOVERNMENT

Jones County Board of Commissioners, 166 Industrial Blvd., (478) 986-6405

GRAY CITY GOVERNMENT

City Hall, 109 James St., Gray, (478) 986-5433

Voter registration

Jones County Government Center, 166 Industrial Blvd., Gray, (478) 986-3222, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays-Fridays

Driver’s licenses

No place in Jones County. Officials advise that licenses can be obtained at the Drivers License Bureau, 200 Cherry St., Terminal Station, Macon from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays, (478) 751-6031

Auto tags

Jones County Tax Commissioner’s Office, Jones County Government Center, Gray, (478) 986-6538, 8:30 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Mondays-Fridays

Emergency numbers

Police Department, 911 or (478) 986-5554

Sheriff’s Office, 911 or (478) 986-3489

Fire, 911 or (478) 986-6672 in Jones County, or (478) 986-5433 in Gray

POPULATION

2010 Census: 28,669

Change, 2000 to 2010: 21.3 percent

White: 73.2 percent

Black: 24.4 percent

Hispanic: 1.1 percent

EDUCATION

High school or better: 85.4 percent

Bachelor’s or better: 17.2 percent

Public high school graduates, 2011: 339

Graduation rate, 2011: 72.1 percent

Public school enrollment, October 2012: 5,525

Eligible for HOPE scholarship: 38.7 percent

Enrolled, white: 69.4 percent

Enrolled, black: 26.7 percent

ECONOMICS

Median household income, 2011: $47,792

People below poverty level: 15.1 percent

Unemployment rate, December 2012: 8

Civilian labor force, December 2012: 14,885

HEALTH

Births per 1,000 people, 2009: 13.4

Deaths per 1,000 people, 2009: 8.9

Births to unwed mothers, 2009: 43.2 percent

Teen pregnancies per 1,000 girls aged 10 to 19: 27.5

People per physician, 2008: 4,547

Uninsured, less than age 65: 17.7 percent

TANF recipients, Fiscal 2010: 0.8 percent

PHYSICAL

Land: 395.4 square miles

Land in farms: 12.8 percent

Road mileage, unpaved, 2010: 34 percent

Sources: Telegraph analysis, Georgia Statistics System, U.S. Census Bureau, Georgia Department of Labor, Georgia Department of Education

Monroe County was formed in 1821 from Creek Indian land. It is named for President James Monroe, the fifth president and author of the Monroe Doctrine.

Forsyth, the county seat, is named for John Forsyth, who as minister to Spain negotiated the purchase of Florida in 1819. Culloden, once a junction of cross-state Indian trails, is the only other municipality. It was named for a Scottish Highlander who opened a store there in 1780. Culloden is also the site of the oldest brick Methodist church in Georgia, built in 1893.

High Falls State Park, the Chattahoochee National Forest and Lake Juliette are located in the county. High Falls used to be the site of a prosperous town that faded away after being bypassed by the railroads in the late 1880s.

Juliette is home to the Whistle Stop Cafe, made famous by the movie “Fried Green Tomatoes,” which filmed there.

MONROE COUNTY GOVERNMENT

Monroe County Commission, 38 W. Main St., Forsyth, (478) 994-7000

CITY GOVERNMENTS

Forsyth City Hall, 26 N. Jackson St., Forsyth, (478) 994-5649

Culloden City Hall, Main Street, Culloden, (478) 885-2249

Voter registration

Registrar’s Office, 550 North Lee St., 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays, (478) 994-7622

Auto tags

Tax Commissioner, 38 W. Main St., Forsyth, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays-Fridays, (478)994-7020

Emergency numbers

Police Department, 911 or (478) 994-6022

Sheriff’s Office, 911 or (478) 944-7048

Fire Department, 911 or (478) 994-2040 in Forsyth, or (478) 994-7004 in Monroe County

Ambulance Service, 911 or (478) 994-7004

POPULATION

2010 Census: 26,424

Change, 2000 to 2010: 21.5 percent

White: 73.3 percent

Black: 23.7 percent

Hispanic: 2 percent

EDUCATION

High school or better: 80.7 percent

Bachelor’s or better: 19 percent

Public high school graduates, 2011: 218

Graduation rate, 2011: 78.4 percent

Public school enrollment, October 2012: 4,090

Eligible for HOPE scholarship: 33.6 percent

Enrolled, white: 68.1 percent

Enrolled, black: 26.6 percent

ECONOMICS

Median household income, 2011: $51,747

People below poverty level: 13.6 percent

Unemployment rate, December 2012: 8.8

Civilian labor force, December 2012: 14,473

HEALTH

Births per 1,000 people, 2009: 11.4

Deaths per 1,000 people, 2009: 10

Births to unwed mothers, 2009: 41.6 percent

Teen pregnancies per 1,000 girls aged 10 to 19: 28.6

People per physician, 2008: 2,785

Uninsured, less than age 65: 17.5 percent

TANF recipients, Fiscal 2010: 0.8 percent

PHYSICAL

Land: 397.8 square miles

Land in farms: 15.5 percent

Road mileage, unpaved, 2010: 16.8 percent

Sources: Telegraph analysis, Georgia Statistics System, U.S. Census Bureau, Georgia Department of Labor, Georgia Department of Education

Twiggs County was created in 1809, taking its territory from Wilkinson County. Georgia’s 37th county was named for Gen. John Twiggs, a prominent leader in the Revolutionary War and the Indian wars.

The county has two municipalities, Jeffersonville and Danville. Jeffersonville, the larger, is also the county seat. It was established in 1828 as Rains’ Store, but its name was changed to honor the Jefferson family, leaders in the county’s early development.

Industrial development in the county centers on the mining and production of kaolin. There are 36 mines and 3,797 acres used for kaolin and sand.

The geographic center of the state is located in the county, near Marion.

TWIGGS COUNTY GOVERNMENT

Twiggs County Commission, 101 Magnolia St., Courthouse Annex, Jeffersonville, (478) 945-3629

JEFFERSONVILLE CITY GOVERNMENT

City Hall, 200 Church St., Jeffersonville, (478) 945-3191

Voter registration

Twiggs County Registrar’s Office, 105 Ash St., Jeffersonville, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays-Fridays, (478) 945-3639

Auto tags

Twiggs County Tax Commissioner’s Office, Millard Hendricks Building, 101 Magnolia St., Jeffersonville, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays-Fridays, (478) 945-3359

Emergency numbers

Police Department, 911 or (478) 945-6972

Sheriff’s Office, 911 or (478) 945-3357

Fire and Emergency Management, (478) 945-6968

Ambulance Service, 911 or 478) 945-6968

POPULATION

2010 Census: 9,023

Change, 2000 to 2010: -14.8 percent

White: 56.8 percent

Black: 41.3 percent

Hispanic: 1.4 percent

EDUCATION

High school or better: 61.4 percent

Bachelor’s or better: 6.7 percent

Public high school graduates, 2011: 60

Graduation rate, 2011: 59.1 percent

Public school enrollment, October 2012: 912

Eligible for HOPE scholarship: 32.7 percent

Enrolled, white: 33 percent

Enrolled, black: 64.5 percent

ECONOMICS

Median household income, 2011: $34,528

People below poverty level: 22.6 percent

Unemployment rate, December 2012: 12.4

Civilian labor force, December 2012: 4,267

HEALTH

Births per 1,000 people, 2009: 9

Deaths per 1,000 people, 2009: 11.7

Births to unwed mothers, 2009: 53.8 percent

Teen pregnancies per 1,000 girls aged 10 to 19: 21.6

People per physician, 2008: 10,218

Uninsured, less than age 65: 21.7 percent

TANF recipients, Fiscal 2010: 2 percent

PHYSICAL

Land: 362.6 square miles

Land in farms: 19.6 percent

Road mileage, unpaved, 2010: 23.2 percent

Sources: Telegraph analysis, Georgia Statistics System, U.S. Census Bureau, Georgia Department of Labor, Georgia Department of Education

The Telegraph is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Commenting FAQs | Terms of Service